Jamie Lennox - Mortgage Adviser - Dimora Marketing

Should you get a survey when buying a property?

Should you get a survey when buying a property

When it comes to buying a property in Norwich, there are many things to consider. One of the most important things on your mind may be whether you should you get a survey when buying a property. A survey is a thorough inspection of the property by a qualified surveyor, which can help you identify any issues or potential problems with the property before you make your purchase. In this blog, we will explore the reasons why you should consider getting a survey done when buying a property in Norwich.

Firstly, getting a survey done can help you to identify any hidden issues with the property. A surveyor will inspect the property in detail, checking for any structural problems, damp, subsidence or other issues that may be hidden from view. This can help you to avoid any nasty surprises after you have purchased the property, which could end up costing you a lot of money to fix.

Secondly, a survey can help you to negotiate the price of the property. If the survey reveals any issues with the property, you may be able to use this information to negotiate a lower price with the seller. For example, if the survey reveals that the property requires significant repairs or renovations, you may be able to use this information to negotiate a lower price.

Thirdly, getting a survey done can give you peace of mind. Buying a property is a significant investment, and it can be stressful to make such a big purchase without knowing exactly what you are getting. A survey can provide you with the reassurance that you are making a sound investment, and that there are no hidden issues that could cause problems in the future.

In conclusion, getting a survey done when buying a property in Norwich is highly recommended. It can help you to identify any hidden issues with the property, negotiate a lower price, give you peace of mind, and may even be a legal requirement. While a survey may seem like an unnecessary expense, it could end up saving you a lot of money and stress in the long run.

Homebuyers vs full structural report 

When looking at getting a survey you may come across two different types: a homebuyer’s report and a full structural survey. Both types of surveys provide detailed information about the condition of the property, but they differ in their level of detail and scope. If you’re still in doubt if you need a survey when buying a property, we will explore the differences between a homebuyer’s report and a full structural survey.

Homebuyers Report

A homebuyer’s report is a mid-range survey that provides an overview of the property’s condition. It is designed to be less detailed than a full structural survey but more comprehensive than a basic valuation report. The homebuyers report typically covers the following areas:

  1. Structural Issues: The surveyor will inspect the property’s structure and identify any visible defects, such as cracks or subsidence.
  2. Damp and Rot: The surveyor will check for signs of damp and rot in the property, including areas such as the roof, walls and floors.
  3. Drainage and Plumbing: The surveyor will inspect the plumbing and drainage systems to ensure they are in good working order.
  4. Electrical Systems: The surveyor will check the electrical systems in the property, including the wiring, sockets, switches and light fittings.
  5. Other Issues: The surveyor may also highlight any other issues that could affect the value of the property, such as boundary disputes or planning permission issues.

Full Structural Survey

A full structural survey is a more comprehensive survey that provides a detailed analysis of the property’s condition. It is designed for properties that are more than 50 years old or have undergone significant renovations. The full structural survey typically covers the following areas:

  1. Structural Issues: The surveyor will inspect the property’s structure in detail, including the foundations, walls, floors and roof. They will identify any defects or issues that could affect the stability of the building.
  2. Damp and Rot: The surveyor will carry out a thorough investigation of the property to identify any signs of damp, rot or insect infestations.
  3. Drainage and Plumbing: The surveyor will inspect the plumbing and drainage systems to ensure they are in good working order. They will also identify any issues with the heating or ventilation systems.
  4. Electrical Systems: The surveyor will check the electrical systems in the property in detail, including the wiring, sockets, switches and light fittings.
  5. Other Issues: The surveyor may also identify any other issues that could affect the value of the property, such as boundary disputes, planning permission issues or potential legal issues.

Which survey should you choose?

The type of survey you choose will depend on the age and condition of the property you are purchasing, as well as your budget. If you are purchasing a relatively new property or a property that has been well-maintained, a homebuyer’s report may be sufficient. However, if you are purchasing an older property or a property that has undergone significant renovations, a full structural survey may be a better option.

In conclusion, both the homebuyer’s report and full structural surveys provide valuable information about the condition of the property you are purchasing. While a homebuyer’s report is less comprehensive and more affordable, a full structural survey is a more detailed and in-depth analysis of the property’s condition. Ultimately, the decision on which type of survey to choose should be based on your individual circumstances and the property you are purchasing.

If you need to find a local firm for you, you can visit RICS website which will have a list of all the local firms to yourself. Alternatively, we have partnered with Watsons to help our clients all across the east of England.

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